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Tips for Helping Seniors Cope with Vision and Hearing Loss

Hearing and vision are the two senses we rely on most to communicate and navigate our environment. When one sense declines, we tend to rely more on the other. When both vision and hearing decline, it becomes distressingly difficult to interact with other people, and our environment. Known as Dual Sensory Loss (DSL), studies estimate that 10%-20% of seniors experience some degree of impairment in both vision and hearing. Because it is so isolating, untreated DSL is associated with depression, cognitive decline, and poor health outcomes. Causes Many different factors can cause hearing loss, including genetics, medications, head injury...

Tips to Prevent Social Isolation in Seniors

Humans are social creatures by nature, and our need to feel connected to others never goes away. As we age, however, connecting with others can become more challenging. Health issues that affect mobility, energy and communication can be especially isolating. According to a 2014 National Seniors Council report, social isolation is the number one emerging issue facing seniors in Canada. Positive social connections play an important role in maintaining physical, mental and cognitive health. If you are concerned that you, or someone you care for, are experiencing social isolation, there are many ways to overcome limitations and improve social...

When Your Loved One Struggles to Take Medication

While medications can improve and prolong our lives, there are many factors that can interfere with our ability or willingness to take medication as directed. Knowing that someone you love is having difficulty sticking to a medication regimen can be frustrating and frightening. Medication non-adherence is very common across all age groups, but for seniors the stakes can be especially high. Up to 25% of nursing home admissions may be attributable to medication non-adherence. It’s important for everyone involved in care to work together to identify and remove barriers. Fortunately there are several things you can do to support...

New Technologies for Seniors with Hearing Loss

Hearing loss is common as we age, and left untreated, can lead to social isolation. It can be exhausting and frustrating trying to participate in conversation, and as a result, even the most outgoing people with declining hearing may begin to avoid social interaction. Research has shown that unidentified and untreated hearing loss can lead to depression, memory loss and decline in cognitive function. Fortunately, the rapid evolution of digital technology has led to new options in the management of hearing loss, including improvements to amplification, and user-friendly accessories and applications. If you or your loved one gave up...

Depression is Not a Part of Aging

Depression is a common treatable mental health condition that can manifest at any age. Although up to 20% of seniors experience depression, they are less likely to be diagnosed and treated. Depression creates barriers to enjoyment of life, and caregivers can play an important role in helping to lift them. How Does Depression Affect Seniors? Depression can manifest itself in unique ways in older adults. While sadness is a common feature of depression in younger people, seniors are more likely to show a lack of energy, low motivation and physical symptoms such as worsening pain. A loss of interest...

Tune Your Brain Into the Classics

The delightful flood of nostalgia that sweeps over us when we hear entertainment from our past is more than just a fleeting joy. It’s also a workout for our brains. Thanks to the digitization of old media, including music, radio shows, commercials, and film, you are just a few clicks away from enjoying the benefits of revisiting these with your loved ones. A Musical Shortcut to Memory Lane Listening to music provides many social, physical and psychological benefits. Neurological research shows that listening to music fires up networks in a number of different areas of the brain, including those...

How to Care for Seniors with Knee Pain

Knee pain is a common concern for seniors. Just like every other joint, knees are impacted by time and gravity. Over the years, every step adds a little wear and tear. By the time a person is 65 or older, they have an increased chance of experiencing persistent or occasional knee pain. What causes knee pain? A number of factors can cause knee pain, including obesity, trauma, and a history of playing high-impact sports. One of the leading causes, however, is osteoarthritis and the breakdown of cartilage. Cartilage is a rubbery substance that acts as a cushion between our...

How to Protect Seniors from Germs

It can be easy to forget about germs. After all, we cannot see them spreading across our hands, meals and surfaces. But these tiny organisms are one of the most dangerous threats to a senior’s health. People over the age of 65 are especially likely to develop complications as a result of the flu. In fact, seniors account for approximately 71 to 85 percent of flu-related deaths in recent years. If a senior already suffers from a chronic condition such as asthma, a seasonal illness can significantly exasperate the symptoms. Common illnesses may seem trivial compared to more severe...

Hearing Loss in Seniors

Hearing loss is one of the most common conditions affecting seniors. It can also be a frustrating and isolating experience. Communication is key, especially between seniors and caregivers. Understanding the symptoms, causes and treatments of hearing loss can help caregivers maintain effective communication and provide valuable care. What are the symptoms of hearing loss? Hearing loss in seniors tends to occur gradually. As a result, many seniors may be unaware that a problem is developing. Caregivers should watch for common signs of hearing loss, including: Asking people to repeat themselves or speak louder Turning up the volume on the...

Recovering from a Stroke: Tips for Caregivers

A stroke can be a frightening and debilitating incident, even once it is over. When a senior returns home from the hospital, receiving thorough and compassionate care is key to a successful recovery. The following advice will help caregivers offer valuable support to seniors after a stroke. Adjust your caregiving. Many caregivers have already been supporting a senior for a period of time when a stroke occurs. After a senior comes home from the hospital, do not expect to fall into the same routines. A stroke typically alters a person’s needs and behaviors in a number of ways. Depending...

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